Category Archives: Podcast Projects


I made this podcast in hopes of reaching out to others within the web development field—to let you know that I’m in the trenches with you when it comes to code. I get excited about how our profession moves forward rapidly but at the same time I’d be lying if I said I’ve never been confused about it as well. That said, I felt compelled to process my thoughts through audio. I hope you enjoy these segments and please feel free to provide feedback. Bookmark this podcast today!

Mighty Morphin Data Structures, Part 3

Introduction

The goal for this season of AllWebSD is to deconstruct lessons learned from going head first into data structures. It’s my hope that I can translate a complex topic into an easy-going format and I’ll do so by channeling my inner 10-year-old self. You see back in my day, I was a big fan of the original Mighty Morphin Power Rangers series. So I’m going to take snapshots from that show and brush it with some code.

Information on data structures are abundant. To be honest, you don’t have to invent this. And frankly, neither did I. Hence, the code is pre-baked and available on Github.

The additional and intentional challenge here is that this is in audio only. If you can follow along, awesome. But remember, the source code is on the repo. I’ll upload a video as well, just in case.

That said, are you ready? Alright then. It’s Morphin Time!




The Situation

Recall from our last episode that Rita just deployed the Putties and Goldar to Angel Grove. They’re causing havoc very quickly and it’s time to address these problems.

The Data Structure

It’s time to introduce our queue.  A linear data structure which obeys the principle of First In, First Out. And that’s exactly what we’ll need to consider granted what Rita just unloaded to the general public.

We’ll create our queue utilizing a function declaration which returns a JavaScript object.

function createQueue() {
	// Store our items in an array held in closure.
	const queue = [];

	return {
		// Use unshift(), to keep the collection of the array in order by adding items to the front.
		enqueue(x) {
			queue.unshift(x);
		},
		// Use pop(), to remove the final item from the array while maintain order.
		dequeue() {
			if (queue.length === 0) {
				return undefined;
			}
			return queue.pop();
		},
		// Return the next item that's ready to be removed.
		peek() {
			if (queue.length === 0) {
				return undefined;
			}
			return queue[queue.length - 1];
		},
		// Use a getter function to get the CURRENT queue's length.
		get length() {
			return queue.length;
		},
		isEmpty() {
			return queue.length === 0;
		}
	}
}

Conclusion

Oh no. What’s that in the sky? Rita’s wand is shooting down like a bolt of lightning. That’s not good. Let me know your thoughts on this choice thus far and other paths that could’ve been considered.


Thanks again for listening in. Remember, I’m here to foster innovation through conversation. So if you’d like to continue this discussion or any topics previously discussed, join me at San Diego Tech Hub and go head first into the AllWebSD Group. It’s totally free. Just visit this link or click San Diego Tech Hub on the footer of AllWebSD.com. Thanks and Aloha!

Mighty Morphin Data Structures, Part 2

Introduction

The goal for this season of AllWebSD is to deconstruct lessons learned from going head first into data structures. It’s my hope that I can translate a complex topic into an easy-going format and I’ll do so by channeling my inner 10-year-old self. You see back in my day, I was a big fan of the original Mighty Morphin Power Rangers series. So I’m going to take snapshots from that show and brush it with some code.

Information on data structures are abundant. To be honest, you don’t have to invent this. And frankly, neither did I. Hence, the code is pre-baked and available on Github.

The additional and intentional challenge here is that this is in audio only. If you can follow along, awesome. But remember, the source code is on the repo. I’ll upload a video as well, just in case.

That said, are you ready? Alright then. It’s Morphin Time!


The Situation

5 ordinary teenagers are now at the command center. After initial shock, they’re starting to gather their senses and are willing to give this Power Ranger thing a try. The viewing globe lights up and we see that Rita’s sent these clay-like spandex goons called Putties and a Golden Armored Monkey to Angel Grove, a city wedged between LA and San Diego. Just kidding. Maybe.

Before they leave to address the issue, Zordon still needs to issue each Ranger their power.

Zack will bestow the powers of Mastodon, Kimberly receives Pterodactyl, Billy gets Triceratops, Trini inherits Sabertooth Tiger and Jason will kick it into high gear with Tyrannosaurus.


Typos for Mastodon and Pterodactyl have been updated on GIthub.

The Data Structure

Array Of Objects

const arrayOfRangers = [
	{
		name: 'Zack',
		power: 'Mastodon',
		isMorphed: false
	},
	{
		name: 'Kimberly',
		power: 'Pterodactyl',
		isMorphed: false
	},
	{
		name: 'Billy',
		power: 'Triceratops',
		isMorphed: false
	},
	{
		name: 'Trini',
		power: 'Sabertooth',
		isMorphed: false
	},
	{
		name: 'Jason',
		power: 'Tyrannosaurus',
		isMorphed: false
	}
];

Glossing over this it looks like I can still quickly access any member of the team by indexes of 0 through 4 and each member of the team now has their power.

Conclusion

Putties are at the park and Goldar is wreaking havoc in down town Angel Grove. There’s no time to waste. Let me know your thoughts on this choice thus far and other paths that could’ve been considered.


Thanks again for listening in. Remember, I’m here to foster innovation through conversation. So if you’d like to continue this discussion or any topics previously discussed, join me at San Diego Tech Hub and go head first into the AllWebSD Group. It’s totally free. Just visit this link or click San Diego Tech Hub on the footer of AllWebSD.com. Thanks and Aloha!

Mighty Morphin Data Structures, Part 1

Introduction

The goal for this season of AllWebSD is to deconstruct lessons learned from going head first into data structures. It’s my hope that I can translate a complex topic into an easy-going format and I’ll do so by channeling my inner 10-year-old self. You see back in my day, I was a big fan of the original Mighty Morphin Power Rangers series. So I’m going to take snapshots from that show and brush it with some code.

Information on data structures are abundant. To be honest, you don’t have to invent this. And frankly, neither did I. Hence, the code is pre-baked and available on Github.

The additional and intentional challenge here is that this is in audio only. If you can follow along, awesome. But remember, the source code is on the repo. I’ll upload a video as well, just in case.

That said, are you ready? Alright then. It’s Morphin Time!




The Situation

“Alpha, Rita’s escaped! Recruit a team of teenagers with attitude.”

The Data Structure

Okay, before I go into teleporting underage kids to the top of a mountain without their consent, I’m going to change the original storyline and instead ask Alpha to contact one person. Hopefully, that alongside word-of-mouth is enough to make a team.

I’m looking at the viewing globe and it looks like this guy Zack teaching Hip Hop Kido at Ernie’s Juice Bar is available. Okay, so I lied. I guess I’m going to have to teleport at least one person without their consent. Hopefully we can do some convincing and the remaining teens will follow.

Minutes pass and the convincing is done, Zack is going to rope in 4 of his other friends to see if they want in on this.

I’ve consulted with Alpha and knowing that we’re assembling this team, Zordon’s going to need a data structure which would allow him quick access to any Ranger should an emergency take place. Alpha offers me two choices, a linked list or an array.

Linked List

const linkedListOfRangers = {
	head: {
		value: 'Zack',
		next: {
			value: 'Kimberly',
			next: {
				value: 'Billy',
				next: {
					value: 'Trini',
					next: {
						value: 'Jason',
						next: null
					}
				}
			}
		}
	}
};

Array

const arrayOfRangers = ['Zack', 'Kimberly', 'Billy', 'Trini', 'Jason'];

Conclusion

Sirens are going off and the viewing globe just activated. Let’s pause on this for now and address the emergency on hand. For today, assembling the team was hard enough. Based on Zordon’s current need, we’ll conclude that an array data structure is the way to go.

Let me know your thoughts on this choice thus far and other paths that could’ve been considered.


Thanks again for listening in. Remember, I’m here to foster innovation through conversation. So if you’d like to continue this discussion or any topics previously discussed, join me at San Diego Tech Hub and go head first into the AllWebSD Group. It’s totally free. Just visit this link or click San Diego Tech Hub on the footer of AllWebSD.com. Thanks and Aloha!